China OEM Impregnation Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps vacuum pump electric

Product Description

>DS450 Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps

  • Complete series with pumping capacity of 120 to 4000 m3/h
  • Optimal ultimate pressure and broadest range of applications
  • Completely dry and oil-free
  • High pumping speed at atmospheric pressure reduces the pump-down time
  • Water cooling with temperature monitoring
  • Saving energy costs through internal compression
  • Wear-free dynamic seal
  • Direct gas flow and optimized temperature profile minimize deposits
  • Low energy consumption, low noise level
  • Extensive range of accessories
Technique data Unit DS0450
Rated flow rate m3/h 450
m3/min 7.5
L/S 125
Ultimate pressure Torr 6×10-3
mbar 0.8×10-2
Pa 0.8
Motor power kw 11
Motor speed rpm 2900/3500
Noise dB(A) 75
Inlet port mm 80
Outlet port mm 65
Volume of cooling water L 10~15
Temperature ºC 0-50
Operating humidity RH 90%

Applications

Distillation (normal, short path & molecular)
Drying (filter, freeze, and transformer drying)
Evaporation
Filtration
House vacuum (central or general/laboratory vacuum service, pilot plants)
Reactor service
Solvent recovery (fuel vapor)
Sterilization (ethylene oxide)
Problem gasses (flammable, low auto-ignition temperatures, corrosive gasses, and hydrogen)
Conveying

Additional Applications Include
Crystallization 
Deodorization 
Degassing 
Desorption 
Fluid handling 
Impregnation
Pervaporation 
Polymerization 
  /* January 22, 2571 19:08:37 */!function(){function s(e,r){var a,o={};try{e&&e.split(“,”).forEach(function(e,t){e&&(a=e.match(/(.*?):(.*)$/))&&1

Oil or Not: Oil Free
Structure: Dry Screw Vacuum Pump
Exhauster Method: Positive Displacement Pump
Vacuum Degree: Vacuum
Work Function: Dry Screw Pump
Working Conditions: Dry
Customization:
Available

|

vacuum pump

What Is the Vacuum Level and How Is It Measured in Vacuum Pumps?

The vacuum level refers to the degree of pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It indicates the level of “emptiness” or the absence of gas molecules in the system. Here’s a detailed explanation of vacuum level measurement in vacuum pumps:

Vacuum level is typically measured using pressure units that represent the difference between the pressure in the vacuum system and atmospheric pressure. The most common unit of measurement for vacuum level is the Pascal (Pa), which is the SI unit. Other commonly used units include Torr, millibar (mbar), and inches of mercury (inHg).

Vacuum pumps are equipped with pressure sensors or gauges that measure the pressure within the vacuum system. These gauges are specifically designed to measure the low pressures encountered in vacuum applications. There are several types of pressure gauges used for measuring vacuum levels:

1. Pirani Gauge: Pirani gauges operate based on the thermal conductivity of gases. They consist of a heated element exposed to the vacuum environment. As gas molecules collide with the heated element, they transfer heat away, causing a change in temperature. By measuring the change in temperature, the pressure can be inferred, allowing the determination of the vacuum level.

2. Thermocouple Gauge: Thermocouple gauges utilize the thermal conductivity of gases similar to Pirani gauges. They consist of two dissimilar metal wires joined together, forming a thermocouple. As gas molecules collide with the thermocouple, they cause a temperature difference between the wires, generating a voltage. The voltage is proportional to the pressure and can be calibrated to provide a reading of the vacuum level.

3. Capacitance Manometer: Capacitance manometers measure pressure by detecting the change in capacitance between two electrodes caused by the deflection of a flexible diaphragm. As the pressure in the vacuum system changes, the diaphragm moves, altering the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

4. Ionization Gauge: Ionization gauges operate by ionizing gas molecules in the vacuum system and measuring the resulting electrical current. The ion current is proportional to the pressure, allowing the determination of the vacuum level. There are different types of ionization gauges, such as hot cathode, cold cathode, and Bayard-Alpert gauges.

5. Baratron Gauge: Baratron gauges utilize the principle of capacitance manometry but with a different design. They consist of a pressure-sensing diaphragm separated by a small gap from a reference electrode. The pressure difference between the vacuum system and the reference electrode causes the diaphragm to deflect, changing the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps may have different pressure ranges and may require specific pressure gauges suitable for their operating conditions. Additionally, vacuum pumps are often equipped with multiple gauges to provide information about the pressure at different stages of the pumping process or in different parts of the system.

In summary, vacuum level refers to the pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It is measured using pressure gauges specifically designed for low-pressure environments. Common types of pressure gauges used in vacuum pumps include Pirani gauges, thermocouple gauges, capacitance manometers, ionization gauges, and Baratron gauges.

\vacuum pump

How Do Vacuum Pumps Contribute to Energy Savings?

Vacuum pumps play a significant role in energy savings in various industries and applications. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Vacuum pumps contribute to energy savings through several mechanisms and efficiencies. Some of the key ways in which vacuum pumps help conserve energy are:

1. Improved Process Efficiency: Vacuum pumps are often used to remove gases and create low-pressure or vacuum conditions in industrial processes. By reducing the pressure, vacuum pumps enable the removal of unwanted gases or vapors, improving the efficiency of the process. For example, in distillation or evaporation processes, vacuum pumps help lower the boiling points of liquids, allowing them to evaporate or distill at lower temperatures. This results in energy savings as less heat is required to achieve the desired separation or concentration.

2. Reduced Energy Consumption: Vacuum pumps are designed to operate efficiently and consume less energy compared to other types of equipment that perform similar functions. Modern vacuum pump designs incorporate advanced technologies, such as variable speed drives, energy-efficient motors, and optimized control systems. These features allow vacuum pumps to adjust their operation based on demand, reducing energy consumption during periods of lower process requirements. By consuming less energy, vacuum pumps contribute to overall energy savings in industrial operations.

3. Leak Detection and Reduction: Vacuum pumps are often used in leak detection processes to identify and locate leaks in systems or equipment. By creating a vacuum or low-pressure environment, vacuum pumps can assess the integrity of a system and identify any sources of leakage. Detecting and repairing leaks promptly helps prevent energy wastage associated with the loss of pressurized fluids or gases. By addressing leaks, vacuum pumps assist in reducing energy losses and improving the overall energy efficiency of the system.

4. Energy Recovery Systems: In some applications, vacuum pumps can be integrated into energy recovery systems. For instance, in certain manufacturing processes, the exhaust gases from vacuum pumps may contain heat or have the potential for energy recovery. By utilizing heat exchangers or other heat recovery systems, the thermal energy from the exhaust gases can be captured and reused to preheat incoming fluids or provide heat to other parts of the process. This energy recovery approach further enhances the overall energy efficiency by utilizing waste heat that would otherwise be lost.

5. System Optimization and Control: Vacuum pumps are often integrated into centralized vacuum systems that serve multiple processes or equipment. These systems allow for better control, monitoring, and optimization of the vacuum generation and distribution. By centralizing the vacuum production and employing intelligent control strategies, energy consumption can be optimized based on the specific process requirements. This ensures that vacuum pumps operate at the most efficient levels, resulting in energy savings.

6. Maintenance and Service: Proper maintenance and regular servicing of vacuum pumps are essential for their optimal performance and energy efficiency. Routine maintenance includes tasks such as cleaning, lubrication, and inspection of pump components. Well-maintained pumps operate more efficiently, reducing energy consumption. Additionally, prompt repair of any faulty parts or addressing performance issues helps maintain the pump’s efficiency and prevents energy waste.

In summary, vacuum pumps contribute to energy savings through improved process efficiency, reduced energy consumption, leak detection and reduction, integration with energy recovery systems, system optimization and control, as well as proper maintenance and service. By utilizing vacuum pumps efficiently and effectively, industries can minimize energy waste, optimize energy usage, and achieve significant energy savings in various applications and processes.

vacuum pump

Can Vacuum Pumps Be Used in Laboratories?

Yes, vacuum pumps are extensively used in laboratories for a wide range of applications. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Vacuum pumps are essential tools in laboratory settings as they enable scientists and researchers to create and control vacuum or low-pressure environments. These controlled conditions are crucial for various scientific processes and experiments. Here are some key reasons why vacuum pumps are used in laboratories:

1. Evaporation and Distillation: Vacuum pumps are frequently used in laboratory evaporation and distillation processes. By creating a vacuum, they lower the boiling point of liquids, allowing for gentler and more controlled evaporation. This is particularly useful for heat-sensitive substances or when precise control over the evaporation process is required.

2. Filtration: Vacuum filtration is a common technique in laboratories for separating solids from liquids or gases. Vacuum pumps create suction, which helps draw the liquid or gas through the filter, leaving the solid particles behind. This method is widely used in processes such as sample preparation, microbiology, and analytical chemistry.

3. Freeze Drying: Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in freeze drying or lyophilization processes. Freeze drying involves removing moisture from a substance while it is in a frozen state, preserving its structure and properties. Vacuum pumps facilitate the sublimation of frozen water directly into vapor, resulting in the removal of moisture under low-pressure conditions.

4. Vacuum Ovens and Chambers: Vacuum pumps are used in conjunction with vacuum ovens and chambers to create controlled low-pressure environments for various applications. Vacuum ovens are used for drying heat-sensitive materials, removing solvents, or conducting reactions under reduced pressure. Vacuum chambers are utilized for testing components under simulated space or high-altitude conditions, degassing materials, or studying vacuum-related phenomena.

5. Analytical Instruments: Many laboratory analytical instruments rely on vacuum pumps to function properly. For example, mass spectrometers, electron microscopes, surface analysis equipment, and other analytical instruments often require vacuum conditions to maintain sample integrity and achieve accurate results.

6. Chemistry and Material Science: Vacuum pumps are employed in numerous chemical and material science experiments. They are used for degassing samples, creating controlled atmospheres, conducting reactions under reduced pressure, or studying gas-phase reactions. Vacuum pumps are also used in thin film deposition techniques like physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

7. Vacuum Systems for Experiments: In scientific research, vacuum systems are often designed and constructed for specific experiments or applications. These systems can include multiple vacuum pumps, valves, and chambers to create specialized vacuum environments tailored to the requirements of the experiment.

Overall, vacuum pumps are versatile tools that find extensive use in laboratories across various scientific disciplines. They enable researchers to control and manipulate vacuum or low-pressure conditions, facilitating a wide range of processes, experiments, and analyses. The choice of vacuum pump depends on factors such as required vacuum level, flow rate, chemical compatibility, and specific application needs.

China OEM Impregnation Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps   vacuum pump electricChina OEM Impregnation Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps   vacuum pump electric
editor by CX 2024-03-08