China Good quality Rail Tanker Filling Systems Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps vacuum pump adapter

Product Description

>DSE280 Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps

Dry screw vacuum pumps operate with 2 screw rotors rotating in opposite directions. This traps the medium to be pumped between the cylinder and the screw chambers and transports it to the gas discharge. The advanced screw design results in lower electric energy consumption compared to standard screw designs. It also results in a lower heat load of the compressed gas.

Cooling can be achieved through a high performance air cooling method eliminating the need of cooling water or indirect cooling method resulting in uniform temperatures throughout the pump body, eliminating cold spots and providing a thermally stable water jacket. The advanced screw design allows for best-in-class hydrogen pumping capabilities. Water cooling can take place in form of both direct water cooling or radiator cooling with air-cooled heat exchangers.

  • Complete series with pumping capacity of 35 to 1100 m3/h
  • Optimal ultimate pressure and broadest range of applications
  • Completely dry and oil-free
  • High pumping speed at atmospheric pressure reduces the pump-down time
  • Water cooling with temperature monitoring
  • Saving energy costs through internal compression
  • Wear-free dynamic seal
  • Direct gas flow and optimized temperature profile minimize deposits
  • Low energy consumption, low noise level
  • Extensive range of accessories
Technical data Unit DSE280
Pumping Speed m3/h 280
L/S 78
Ultimate Vacuum Torr 0.03
Pa 4
Motor Power Kw 7.5
Motor speed rpm 2900
Inlet Flange mm DN80
Outlet Flange mm DN40
Cooling Water Pressure barg 2~4
Cooling Water Flow L/min 6
Cooling Water Temp ºC 5-35
Noise dB(A) ≤75
Weight Kg 253

Applications

  • Solvent recovery – to recover solvents from a process medium
  • Vacuum-supported distillation – in pharmaceutical or chemical applications
  • Crude oil distillation – to separate out individual hydrocarbons
  •  
  • Freeze drying
  • Cleaning/Drying of industrial parts
  •  
  • Mold evacuation
  • Transfer chambers
  • Process chambers
  • Heat treatment
  • Space simulation
  •  
  • Steel degassing

  • Thermoforming
  • Veneer pressing
  • Vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VRTM)
  • Flat panel display lamination
  • Solar panel lamination
  •  
  • Plasma enhanced deposition
  • Physical vapor deposition
  • Chemical vapor deposition
  •  
  • Storage tank systems
  • Rail tanker filling systems
  • Road tanker filling systems
  • Loading and unloading stations for tanker ships
  • Vapor recovery during production processes

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Oil or Not: Oil Free
Structure: Dry Screw Vacuum Pump
Exhauster Method: Positive Displacement Pump
Vacuum Degree: Vacuum
Work Function: Dry Screw Pump
Working Conditions: Dry
Customization:
Available

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vacuum pump

What Is the Vacuum Level and How Is It Measured in Vacuum Pumps?

The vacuum level refers to the degree of pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It indicates the level of “emptiness” or the absence of gas molecules in the system. Here’s a detailed explanation of vacuum level measurement in vacuum pumps:

Vacuum level is typically measured using pressure units that represent the difference between the pressure in the vacuum system and atmospheric pressure. The most common unit of measurement for vacuum level is the Pascal (Pa), which is the SI unit. Other commonly used units include Torr, millibar (mbar), and inches of mercury (inHg).

Vacuum pumps are equipped with pressure sensors or gauges that measure the pressure within the vacuum system. These gauges are specifically designed to measure the low pressures encountered in vacuum applications. There are several types of pressure gauges used for measuring vacuum levels:

1. Pirani Gauge: Pirani gauges operate based on the thermal conductivity of gases. They consist of a heated element exposed to the vacuum environment. As gas molecules collide with the heated element, they transfer heat away, causing a change in temperature. By measuring the change in temperature, the pressure can be inferred, allowing the determination of the vacuum level.

2. Thermocouple Gauge: Thermocouple gauges utilize the thermal conductivity of gases similar to Pirani gauges. They consist of two dissimilar metal wires joined together, forming a thermocouple. As gas molecules collide with the thermocouple, they cause a temperature difference between the wires, generating a voltage. The voltage is proportional to the pressure and can be calibrated to provide a reading of the vacuum level.

3. Capacitance Manometer: Capacitance manometers measure pressure by detecting the change in capacitance between two electrodes caused by the deflection of a flexible diaphragm. As the pressure in the vacuum system changes, the diaphragm moves, altering the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

4. Ionization Gauge: Ionization gauges operate by ionizing gas molecules in the vacuum system and measuring the resulting electrical current. The ion current is proportional to the pressure, allowing the determination of the vacuum level. There are different types of ionization gauges, such as hot cathode, cold cathode, and Bayard-Alpert gauges.

5. Baratron Gauge: Baratron gauges utilize the principle of capacitance manometry but with a different design. They consist of a pressure-sensing diaphragm separated by a small gap from a reference electrode. The pressure difference between the vacuum system and the reference electrode causes the diaphragm to deflect, changing the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps may have different pressure ranges and may require specific pressure gauges suitable for their operating conditions. Additionally, vacuum pumps are often equipped with multiple gauges to provide information about the pressure at different stages of the pumping process or in different parts of the system.

In summary, vacuum level refers to the pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It is measured using pressure gauges specifically designed for low-pressure environments. Common types of pressure gauges used in vacuum pumps include Pirani gauges, thermocouple gauges, capacitance manometers, ionization gauges, and Baratron gauges.

\vacuum pump

How Do Vacuum Pumps Affect the Performance of Vacuum Chambers?

When it comes to the performance of vacuum chambers, vacuum pumps play a critical role. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Vacuum chambers are enclosed spaces designed to create and maintain a low-pressure environment. They are used in various industries and scientific applications, such as manufacturing, research, and material processing. Vacuum pumps are used to evacuate air and other gases from the chamber, creating a vacuum or low-pressure condition. The performance of vacuum chambers is directly influenced by the characteristics and operation of the vacuum pumps used.

Here are some key ways in which vacuum pumps affect the performance of vacuum chambers:

1. Achieving and Maintaining Vacuum Levels: The primary function of vacuum pumps is to create and maintain the desired vacuum level within the chamber. Vacuum pumps remove air and other gases, reducing the pressure inside the chamber. The efficiency and capacity of the vacuum pump determine how quickly the desired vacuum level is achieved and how well it is maintained. High-performance vacuum pumps can rapidly evacuate the chamber and maintain the desired vacuum level even when there are gas leaks or continuous gas production within the chamber.

2. Pumping Speed: The pumping speed of a vacuum pump refers to the volume of gas it can remove from the chamber per unit of time. The pumping speed affects the rate at which the chamber can be evacuated and the time required to achieve the desired vacuum level. A higher pumping speed allows for faster evacuation and shorter cycle times, improving the overall efficiency of the vacuum chamber.

3. Ultimate Vacuum Level: The ultimate vacuum level is the lowest pressure that can be achieved in the chamber. It depends on the design and performance of the vacuum pump. Higher-quality vacuum pumps can achieve lower ultimate vacuum levels, which are important for applications requiring higher levels of vacuum or for processes that are sensitive to residual gases.

4. Leak Detection and Gas Removal: Vacuum pumps can also assist in leak detection and gas removal within the chamber. By continuously evacuating the chamber, any leaks or gas ingress can be identified and addressed promptly. This ensures that the chamber maintains the desired vacuum level and minimizes the presence of contaminants or unwanted gases.

5. Contamination Control: Some vacuum pumps, such as oil-sealed pumps, use lubricating fluids that can introduce contaminants into the chamber. These contaminants may be undesirable for certain applications, such as semiconductor manufacturing or research. Therefore, the choice of vacuum pump and its potential for introducing contaminants should be considered to maintain the required cleanliness and purity of the vacuum chamber.

6. Noise and Vibrations: Vacuum pumps can generate noise and vibrations during operation, which can impact the performance and usability of the vacuum chamber. Excessive noise or vibrations can interfere with delicate experiments, affect the accuracy of measurements, or cause mechanical stress on the chamber components. Selecting vacuum pumps with low noise and vibration levels is important for maintaining optimal chamber performance.

It’s important to note that the specific requirements and performance factors of a vacuum chamber can vary depending on the application. Different types of vacuum pumps, such as rotary vane pumps, dry pumps, or turbomolecular pumps, offer varying capabilities and features that cater to specific needs. The choice of vacuum pump should consider factors such as the desired vacuum level, pumping speed, ultimate vacuum, contamination control, noise and vibration levels, and compatibility with the chamber materials and gases used.

In summary, vacuum pumps have a significant impact on the performance of vacuum chambers. They enable the creation and maintenance of the desired vacuum level, affect the pumping speed and ultimate vacuum achieved, assist in leak detection and gas removal, and influence contamination control. Careful consideration of the vacuum pump selection ensures optimal chamber performance for various applications.

vacuum pump

What Is the Purpose of a Vacuum Pump in an HVAC System?

In an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) system, a vacuum pump serves a crucial purpose. Here’s a detailed explanation:

The purpose of a vacuum pump in an HVAC system is to remove air and moisture from the refrigerant lines and the system itself. HVAC systems, particularly those that rely on refrigeration, operate under specific pressure and temperature conditions to facilitate the transfer of heat. To ensure optimal performance and efficiency, it is essential to evacuate any non-condensable gases, air, and moisture from the system.

Here are the key reasons why a vacuum pump is used in an HVAC system:

1. Removing Moisture: Moisture can be present within an HVAC system due to various factors, such as system installation, leaks, or improper maintenance. When moisture combines with the refrigerant, it can cause issues like ice formation, reduced system efficiency, and potential damage to system components. A vacuum pump helps remove moisture by creating a low-pressure environment, which causes the moisture to boil and turn into vapor, effectively evacuating it from the system.

2. Eliminating Air and Non-Condensable Gases: Air and non-condensable gases, such as nitrogen or oxygen, can enter an HVAC system during installation, repair, or through leaks. These gases can hinder the refrigeration process, affect heat transfer, and decrease system performance. By using a vacuum pump, technicians can evacuate the air and non-condensable gases, ensuring that the system operates with the designed refrigerant and pressure levels.

3. Preparing for Refrigerant Charging: Prior to charging the HVAC system with refrigerant, it is crucial to create a vacuum to remove any contaminants and ensure the system is clean and ready for optimal refrigerant circulation. By evacuating the system with a vacuum pump, technicians ensure that the refrigerant enters a clean and controlled environment, reducing the risk of system malfunctions and improving overall efficiency.

4. Leak Detection: Vacuum pumps are also used in HVAC systems for leak detection purposes. After evacuating the system, technicians can monitor the pressure to check if it holds steady. A significant drop in pressure indicates the presence of leaks, enabling technicians to identify and repair them before charging the system with refrigerant.

In summary, a vacuum pump plays a vital role in an HVAC system by removing moisture, eliminating air and non-condensable gases, preparing the system for refrigerant charging, and aiding in leak detection. These functions help ensure optimal system performance, energy efficiency, and longevity, while also reducing the risk of system malfunctions and damage.

China Good quality Rail Tanker Filling Systems Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps   vacuum pump adapter	China Good quality Rail Tanker Filling Systems Dry Screw Vacuum Pumps   vacuum pump adapter
editor by CX 2024-03-14