China factory Silent Portable 3/4HP Twin Mini Rocking Food Industry Detailing Milker Braking Laboratory Dental Airbrush Piston Motor Head Air Dry Oilless Oil Free Vacuum Pump with high quality

Product Description

Silent Portable 3/4HP Twin Mini Rocking Food Industry Detailing Milker Braking Laboratory Dental Airbrush Piston motor Head Oilless Oil Free Air Dry Vacuum Pump

Advantages:
Oil-less Vacuum Pumps / Air Compressors

PRANSCH oil-less rocking piston pump and air compressor combines the best characteristics of traditional piston pumps(air compressor) and diaphragm pumps into small units with excellent features.

  1. Light weight and very portable
  2. Durable and near ZERO maintenance
  3. Thermal protection (130 deg C)
  4. Power cord with plug, 1m length
  5. Shock mount
  6. Silencer – muffler
  7. Stainless steel vacuum and pressure gauge, both with oil damping
  8. Two stainless steel needle valves each with lock nut.
  9. All nickel plated fittings
  10. Power supply 230V, 50/60 Hz

This series is ideal for use in applications where oil-mist is undesirable. For examples, pressure/vacuum filtration, air sampling, water aeration, flame photometer, etc.

Specification:

Model Frequency Flow Pressure Power Speed Current Voltage Heat Sound Weight Hole Installation Dimensions
Hz L/min Kpa Kw Min-1 A V 0 C db(A) Kg MM MM
PM200V 50 33 -84 0.10  1380 0.45  210/235 5-40 48 1.8  5 L100xW74
60 50 -84 0.12 1450 0.90  110/125 5-40 48 1.8  5
PM300V 50 66 -86 0.12 1380 0.56  210/235 5-40 50 3.2  6 L118xW70
60 75 -86 0.14 1450 1.13  110/125 5-40 50 3.2  6
PM400V 50 80 -92 0.32 1380 0.95  210/235 5-40 56 6.0  6 L153xW95
60 92 -92 0.36 1450 1.91  110/125 5-40 56 6.0  6
PM550V 50 100 -92 0.32 1380 1.50  210/235 5-40 56 6.0  6 L148xW83
60 110 -92 0.36 1450 3.10  110/125 5-40 56 6.0  6
PM1400V 50 166 -92 0.45 1380 1.90  210/235 5-40 58 8.5  6 L203xW86
60 183 -92 0.52 1450 4.10  110/125 5-40 58 8.5  6
PM2000V 50 216 -92 0.55 1380 2.50  210/235 5-40 60 9.0  6 L203xW86
60 250 -92 0.63 1450 5.20  110/125 5-40 60 9.0  6
HP2400V 50 225 -94 0.90  1380 3.30  210/235 5-40 75 17.0  7 L246xW127
60 258 -94 1.10  1450 6.90  110/125 5-40 75 17.0  7
PM3000V 50 230 -94 1.10  1380 4.20  210/235 5-40 76 17.5  7 L246xW127
60 266 -94 1.30  1450 8.50  110/125 5-40 76 17.5  7

Why use a Rocking Piston Product?
Variety
Pransch oilless Rocking Piston air compressors and vacuum pumps, available in single, twin, miniature, and tankmounted
styles, are the perfect choice for hundreds of applications. Choose from dual frequency, shaded pole,
and permanent split capacitor (psc) electric motors with AC multi-voltage motors to match North American,
European, and CHINAMFG power supplies. A complete line of recommended accessories as well as 6, 12, and
24 volt DC models in brush and brushless types are also available.

Performance
The rocking piston combines the best characteristics of piston and diaphragm air compressors into a small unit
with exceptional performance. Air flow capabilities from 3.4 LPM to 5.5 CFM (9.35 m3/h), pressure to 175 psi
(12.0 bar) and vacuum capabilities up to 29 inHg (31 mbar). Horsepowers range from 1/20 to 1/2 HP
(0.04 to 0.37 kW).

Reliable
These pumps are made to stand up through years of use. The piston rod and bearing assembly are bonded
together, not clamped; they will not slip, loosen, or misalign to cause trouble.

Clean Air
Because CHINAMFG pumps are oil-free, they are ideal for use in applications in laboratories, hospitals, and the
food industry where oil mist contamination is undesirable.

Application:

  1. Transportation application include:Auto detailing Equipment,Braking Systems,Suspension Systems,Tire Inflators
  2. Food and Beverage application include:beverage dispensing,coffee and Espresso equipment,Food processing and packaging,Nitrogen Generation
  3. Medical and laboratory application include:Body fluid Analysis equipment,Dental compressors and hand tools,dental vacuum ovens,Dermatology equipment,eye surgery equipment,lab automation,Liposuction equipment,Medical aspiration,Nitrogen Generation,Oxygen concentrators,Vacuum Centrifuge,vacuum filtering,ventilators
  4. General industrial application include:Cable pressurization,core drilling
  5. Environmental application include:Dry sprinkler systems,Pond Aeration,Refrigerant Reclamation,Water Purification Systems
  6. Printing and packaging application include:vacuum frames
  7. material Handling application include:vacuum mixing

 

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Oil or Not: Oil Free
Structure: Reciprocating Vacuum Pump
Exhauster Method: Positive Displacement Pump
Vacuum Degree: High Vacuum
Work Function: Mainsuction Pump
Working Conditions: Dry
Customization:
Available

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vacuum pump

What Is the Vacuum Level and How Is It Measured in Vacuum Pumps?

The vacuum level refers to the degree of pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It indicates the level of “emptiness” or the absence of gas molecules in the system. Here’s a detailed explanation of vacuum level measurement in vacuum pumps:

Vacuum level is typically measured using pressure units that represent the difference between the pressure in the vacuum system and atmospheric pressure. The most common unit of measurement for vacuum level is the Pascal (Pa), which is the SI unit. Other commonly used units include Torr, millibar (mbar), and inches of mercury (inHg).

Vacuum pumps are equipped with pressure sensors or gauges that measure the pressure within the vacuum system. These gauges are specifically designed to measure the low pressures encountered in vacuum applications. There are several types of pressure gauges used for measuring vacuum levels:

1. Pirani Gauge: Pirani gauges operate based on the thermal conductivity of gases. They consist of a heated element exposed to the vacuum environment. As gas molecules collide with the heated element, they transfer heat away, causing a change in temperature. By measuring the change in temperature, the pressure can be inferred, allowing the determination of the vacuum level.

2. Thermocouple Gauge: Thermocouple gauges utilize the thermal conductivity of gases similar to Pirani gauges. They consist of two dissimilar metal wires joined together, forming a thermocouple. As gas molecules collide with the thermocouple, they cause a temperature difference between the wires, generating a voltage. The voltage is proportional to the pressure and can be calibrated to provide a reading of the vacuum level.

3. Capacitance Manometer: Capacitance manometers measure pressure by detecting the change in capacitance between two electrodes caused by the deflection of a flexible diaphragm. As the pressure in the vacuum system changes, the diaphragm moves, altering the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

4. Ionization Gauge: Ionization gauges operate by ionizing gas molecules in the vacuum system and measuring the resulting electrical current. The ion current is proportional to the pressure, allowing the determination of the vacuum level. There are different types of ionization gauges, such as hot cathode, cold cathode, and Bayard-Alpert gauges.

5. Baratron Gauge: Baratron gauges utilize the principle of capacitance manometry but with a different design. They consist of a pressure-sensing diaphragm separated by a small gap from a reference electrode. The pressure difference between the vacuum system and the reference electrode causes the diaphragm to deflect, changing the capacitance and providing a measurement of the vacuum level.

It’s important to note that different types of vacuum pumps may have different pressure ranges and may require specific pressure gauges suitable for their operating conditions. Additionally, vacuum pumps are often equipped with multiple gauges to provide information about the pressure at different stages of the pumping process or in different parts of the system.

In summary, vacuum level refers to the pressure below atmospheric pressure in a vacuum system. It is measured using pressure gauges specifically designed for low-pressure environments. Common types of pressure gauges used in vacuum pumps include Pirani gauges, thermocouple gauges, capacitance manometers, ionization gauges, and Baratron gauges.

\vacuum pump

What Is the Difference Between Dry and Wet Vacuum Pumps?

Dry and wet vacuum pumps are two distinct types of pumps that differ in their operating principles and applications. Here’s a detailed explanation of the differences between them:

Dry Vacuum Pumps:

Dry vacuum pumps operate without the use of any lubricating fluid or sealing water in the pumping chamber. They rely on non-contact mechanisms to create a vacuum. Some common types of dry vacuum pumps include:

1. Rotary Vane Pumps: Rotary vane pumps consist of a rotor with vanes that slide in and out of slots in the rotor. The rotation of the rotor creates chambers that expand and contract, allowing the gas to be pumped. The vanes and the housing are designed to create a seal, preventing gas from flowing back into the pump. Rotary vane pumps are commonly used in laboratories, medical applications, and industrial processes where a medium vacuum level is required.

2. Dry Screw Pumps: Dry screw pumps use two or more intermeshing screws to compress and transport gas. As the screws rotate, the gas is trapped between the threads and transported from the suction side to the discharge side. Dry screw pumps are known for their high pumping speeds, low noise levels, and ability to handle various gases. They are used in applications such as semiconductor manufacturing, chemical processing, and vacuum distillation.

3. Claw Pumps: Claw pumps use two rotors with claw-shaped lobes that rotate in opposite directions. The rotation creates a series of expanding and contracting chambers, enabling gas capture and pumping. Claw pumps are known for their oil-free operation, high pumping speeds, and suitability for handling dry and clean gases. They are commonly used in applications such as automotive manufacturing, food packaging, and environmental technology.

Wet Vacuum Pumps:

Wet vacuum pumps, also known as liquid ring pumps, operate by using a liquid, typically water, to create a seal and generate a vacuum. The liquid ring serves as both the sealing medium and the working fluid. Wet vacuum pumps are commonly used in applications where a higher level of vacuum is required or when handling corrosive gases. Some key features of wet vacuum pumps include:

1. Liquid Ring Pumps: Liquid ring pumps feature an impeller with blades that rotate eccentrically within a cylindrical casing. As the impeller rotates, the liquid forms a ring against the casing due to centrifugal force. The liquid ring creates a seal, and as the impeller spins, the volume of the gas chamber decreases, leading to the compression and discharge of gas. Liquid ring pumps are known for their ability to handle wet and corrosive gases, making them suitable for applications such as chemical processing, oil refining, and wastewater treatment.

2. Water Jet Pumps: Water jet pumps utilize a jet of high-velocity water to create a vacuum. The water jet entrains gases, and the mixture is then separated in a venturi section, where the water is recirculated, and the gases are discharged. Water jet pumps are commonly used in laboratories and applications where a moderate vacuum level is required.

The main differences between dry and wet vacuum pumps can be summarized as follows:

1. Operating Principle: Dry vacuum pumps operate without the need for any sealing fluid, while wet vacuum pumps utilize a liquid ring or water as a sealing and working medium.

2. Lubrication: Dry vacuum pumps do not require lubrication since there is no contact between moving parts, whereas wet vacuum pumps require the presence of a liquid for sealing and lubrication.

3. Applications: Dry vacuum pumps are suitable for applications where a medium vacuum level is required, and oil-free operation is desired. They are commonly used in laboratories, medical settings, and various industrial processes. Wet vacuum pumps, on the other hand, are used when a higher vacuum level is needed or when handling corrosive gases. They find applications in chemical processing, oil refining, and wastewater treatment, among others.

It’s important to note that the selection of a vacuum pump depends on specific requirements such as desired vacuum level, gas compatibility, operating conditions, and the nature of the application.

In summary, the primary distinction between dry and wet vacuum pumps lies in their operating principles, lubrication requirements, and applications. Dry vacuum pumps operate without any lubricating fluid, while wet vacuum pumps rely on a liquid ring or water for sealing and lubrication. The choice between dry and wet vacuum pumps depends on the specific needs of the application and the desired vacuum level.

vacuum pump

Can Vacuum Pumps Be Used in the Medical Field?

Yes, vacuum pumps have a wide range of applications in the medical field. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Vacuum pumps play a crucial role in various medical applications, providing suction or creating controlled vacuum environments. Here are some key areas where vacuum pumps are used in the medical field:

1. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT):

Vacuum pumps are extensively utilized in negative pressure wound therapy, a technique used to promote wound healing. In NPWT, a vacuum pump creates a controlled low-pressure environment within a wound dressing, facilitating the removal of excess fluid, promoting blood flow, and accelerating the healing process.

2. Surgical Suction:

Vacuum pumps are an integral part of surgical suction systems. They provide the necessary suction force to remove fluids, gases, or debris from the surgical site during procedures. Surgical suction helps maintain a clear field of view for surgeons, enhances tissue visualization, and contributes to a sterile operating environment.

3. Anesthesia:

In anesthesia machines, vacuum pumps are used to create suction for various purposes:

– Airway Suction: Vacuum pumps assist in airway suctioning to clear secretions or obstructions from the patient’s airway during anesthesia or emergency situations.

– Evacuation of Gases: Vacuum pumps aid in removing exhaled gases from the patient’s breathing circuit, ensuring the delivery of fresh gas mixtures and maintaining appropriate anesthesia levels.

4. Laboratory Equipment:

Vacuum pumps are essential components in various medical laboratory equipment:

– Vacuum Ovens: Vacuum pumps are used in vacuum drying ovens, which are utilized for controlled drying or heat treatment of sensitive materials, samples, or laboratory glassware.

– Centrifugal Concentrators: Vacuum pumps are employed in centrifugal concentrators to facilitate the concentration or dehydration of biological samples, such as DNA, proteins, or viruses.

– Freeze Dryers: Vacuum pumps play a vital role in freeze-drying processes, where samples are frozen and then subjected to vacuum conditions to remove water via sublimation, preserving the sample’s structure and integrity.

5. Medical Suction Devices:

Vacuum pumps are utilized in standalone medical suction devices, commonly found in hospitals, clinics, and emergency settings. These devices create suction required for various medical procedures, including:

– Suctioning of Respiratory Secretions: Vacuum pumps assist in removing respiratory secretions or excess fluids from the airways of patients who have difficulty coughing or clearing their airways effectively.

– Thoracic Drainage: Vacuum pumps are used in chest drainage systems to evacuate air or fluid from the pleural cavity, helping in the treatment of conditions such as pneumothorax or pleural effusion.

– Obstetrics and Gynecology: Vacuum pumps are employed in devices used for vacuum-assisted deliveries, such as vacuum extractors, to aid in the safe delivery of babies during childbirth.

6. Blood Collection and Processing:

Vacuum pumps are utilized in blood collection systems and blood processing equipment:

– Blood Collection Tubes: Vacuum pumps are responsible for creating the vacuum inside blood collection tubes, facilitating the collection of blood samples for diagnostic testing.

– Blood Separation and Centrifugation: In blood processing equipment, vacuum pumps assist in the separation of blood components, such as red blood cells, plasma, and platelets, for various medical procedures and treatments.

7. Medical Imaging:

Vacuum pumps are used in certain medical imaging techniques:

– Electron Microscopy: Electron microscopes, including scanning electron microscopes and transmission electron microscopes, require a vacuum environment for high-resolution imaging. Vacuum pumps are employed to maintain the necessary vacuum conditions within the microscope chambers.

These are just a few examples of the wide-ranging applications of vacuum pumps in the medical field. Their ability to create suction and controlled vacuum environments makes them indispensable in medical procedures, wound healing, laboratory processes, anesthesia, and various other medical applications.

China factory Silent Portable 3/4HP Twin Mini Rocking Food Industry Detailing Milker Braking Laboratory Dental Airbrush Piston Motor Head Air Dry Oilless Oil Free Vacuum Pump   with high quality China factory Silent Portable 3/4HP Twin Mini Rocking Food Industry Detailing Milker Braking Laboratory Dental Airbrush Piston Motor Head Air Dry Oilless Oil Free Vacuum Pump   with high quality
editor by CX 2024-01-23